Events

To publicise language events held at the University of Leeds, please contact language@leeds.ac.uk

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Speakers: Dr Jack Wilson (University of Salford) and Janet Watson (University of Leeds) Abstract: The structure of co-speech gesture closely correlates with the syntactic organisation of a co-articulated spoken language. Studies have shown that the realisation of semantic features in speech is temporally aligned with gesture (Kita and Özyürek, 2003). For example, languages (e.g., see…
This workshop will introduce you to Python, a high-level programming language for general-purpose programming that focuses on code readability and efficiency. It will prepare you for the PsychoPy workshop (7th of June) by familiarising you with key Python objects (variables, lists and dicts, if-statements, and for-loops). The workshop will be delivered by Martin Callaghan. Attendance…
You are kindly invited to an informal meeting with Centre for Translation Studies (CTS) alumna Beth Gardner. Beth completed her MA Conference Interpreting and Translation Studies (MACITS) in 2011 with French and Italian, and moved to Italy the following year to work as a Personal Assistant/Marketing Coordinator for a manufacturing company. About 2 years ago…
Research Seminar Series in Interpreting and Translation Studies Supported by the LCS Strategic Research Development Fund Abstract The design of community interpreting research studies can incorporate triangulation of research data using different methodologies in order to test or explore the same phenomena from different perspectives (Hale & Napier, in press). This approach is typically referred…
In this workshop, you will learn now to use the intuitive Builder interface PsychoPy. This interface aims to be easy enough for use in undergraduate teaching, yet flexible enough for high-precision experimental psychology. Getting started with basic experiments is really easy, but this workshop will show you how to extend those simple experiments into more…
This is an event jointly hosted by CELT (Centre for Excellence in Language Teaching) and CIRLE (Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education) on 13th of June – ‘Linguistic insights into the needs of International Law (LLM) students’ (Jenny Kemp, University of Leicester). For further information and to register for the event please follow the…
Multilingualism and multiliteracy in primary school children in India: Linguistic and cognitive effects. A starting point of this research is that bilingualism and multilingualism have revealed cognitive advantages and good learning skills in children raised in Western societies. Multilingualism is the norm in India. However, rather than enjoying cognitive and learning advantages, multilingual Indian children show  low levels of…
The Workshop on Computational Approaches to Morphologically Rich  Languages (#CAMRL2018) is organised by the Centre for Kartvelian and Caucasian Studies at the University of Leeds. This one-day workshop aims to bring together established specialists and postgraduate research students working in the field of computational morphology and morphosyntax. The Workshop will feature plenary talks by Dunstan Brown from the…

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Speaker – Barbara Bethäusser-Conte  Conference Interpreter & Translator – Member of AIIC (German – English – French) A-level equivalent in Germany, BA Hons French and European Studies, University of Sussex, studies in translation and conference interpreting at the University of Bath and Ecole Supérieure d’Interprètes et de Traducteurs, Paris; Postgraduate Diploma in Interpreting and Translation….
Linear regression models are statistical tools used to uncover the relation between a response variable and set of predictor variables. Standard least-squares linear regression estimates how the mean response varies with the predictors. However, there are cases where the behaviour of the mean response is not the main object of interest. For example, suppose that we are interested in quantifying the relation…
You are warmly invited to the fourth meeting of Language and Nature Sadler Seminar series. This session will be about “Language, nature, quantification & value”, with presentations by: Eva Shultze-Berndt (University of Manchester) presents the talk “Let’s sit face to face and pluck them iteratively all over together, to completion, in sets of one”: The preference of event quantification…
You are invited to take part in the next seminar of Centre for Language Education Research (CLER) Seminar Series in 2017/18 Professor Leketi Makalela, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa & City University of New York, USA Research on multilingual education is replete with critiques of ways of knowing that are conceived from what is…
We are pleased to announce the upcoming Translation in the News Symposium that will be held on the 10th of May in the University of Leeds and which deals with the role of translation in the production of news. However,the symposium is not limited to the news and deals as well with all analyses that do…
Research talk by Dr Cat Davies (Linguistics & Phonetics) Inferencing is essential for children’s understanding of extended discourse, but relatively little is known about which experiences might encourage inferencing skills during the preschool years. Using a randomised control trial, we tested the effect of increasing exposure to inferential questions during shared book reading on 4-year-olds’…
Version control can be thought of as the research notebook of the digital world: it’s what professional software developers and authors use to keep track of what they’ve done and to collaborate with other people. Every large software project relies on it, and many people who write code use it for their small jobs as…
Speaker: Dr Binghan Zheng (Durham University) Abstract: Translation process research (TPR) can be traced back to the empirical school emerged in the 1980s in European countries. Aiming to uncover the mysterious “Black Box” of human translation process, TPR scholars have borrowed various methods from neighbouring disciplines, such as psychology and cognitive science, and gained TPR…
Invited research talk by Dr Iona Hine & Prof Susan Fitzmaurice, University of Sheffield Over the past three years, the Linguistic DNA team has been developing a set of of computational methods for identifying discursive concepts in the universe of early modern English discourse transcribed from Early English Books Online by the Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP). The task of modelling discursive concepts in…
For the next meeting of the Arabic PGR group, we are glad to host a talk by Dr. Barry Heselwood about “Makhraj al-ḥarf and related terms in early Arabic phonetics”. Abstract to follow: “There are essentially two reasons for looking at the phonetic descriptions of Arabic by what have come to be called the ‘early Arab grammarians’. Firstly,…